Posts Tagged ‘Living’

Million of baby boomers are due to retire over the next few years and many are worried about their standard of living.

Their living longer, have not saved enough, have reduced state support and soaring medical insurance. So what can they do to maintain their standard of living?

The answer lies just 3 hours from the US. They can retire to Costa Rica and not just make ends meet, but improve their standard of living and their still close to

off

Million of baby boomers are due to retire over the next few years and many are worried about their standard of living.

Their living longer, have not saved enough, have reduced state support and soaring medical insurance. So what can they do to maintain their standard of living?

The answer lies just 3 hours from the US. They can retire to Costa Rica and not just make ends meet, but improve their standard of living and their still close to

off

Americans Seek Affordable and Exotic Retirement Living – Find It in Nearby Costa Rica










Dominical, Costa Rica (PRWEB) March 21, 2007

Many of America’s retirees are spending their nonworking days in Costa Rica. Initially drawn by the country’s magnificent landscape and weather, retirees often remain in the country for many other reasons. Cost of living and property are reasonable. The tropical climate eliminates the need for air conditioning and heat and the natives are welcoming to American retirees.

Cost of living in neighboring countries Honduras and Nicaragua is slightly less than Costa Rica, but so is the quality of life. In Costa Rica, a monthly income of only $ 900 to $ 1200 affords a middle-class American standard of living (http://www.developingparadise.com). Retirees with over $ 2,000 per month can typically live a rather luxurious lifestyle.

Much of this is due to the strength of Costa Rica’s currency and the dollars purchasing power. A full-time maid costs less than $ 300 each month. Costa Rican utilities, such as electricity and water, are one-third the price of North American utilities. Traveling across the entire country using public transportation is no more than $ 10, and a gallon of gasoline costs approximately $ 1.75. The country’s capital (San Jose) has some of the least expensive goods and services in the world.

Retired persons can also begin second careers in Costa Rica. The development of new small businesses is welcomed and encouraged. In general, cafés and retail stores that sell fresh fruit are among the most popular options that afford long-term financial stability and feasibility.

As a result, Costa Rica real estate (http://www.paradisebrokers.net) is gaining increased attention from American retirees and other individuals looking to purchase real estate in a foreign country. This has caused Costa Rica property prices to go up in recent years. However, Costa Rica has not adjusted to property values, and the cost of living remains much lower than America, Europe or Canada.

About Paradise Brokers

Paradise Brokers (http://www.paradisebrokers.net) is ‘developing paradise’ in Costa Rica as a full service real estate investment, development and property management company. Whether you are interested in panoramic ocean views, waterfalls, golf course lots, or mountain and river views, Paradise Brokers has it all: financing available. Their four offices provide unparalleled service and accessibility and that’s why COO Nick Halverson says, “We didn’t create paradise, we make it accessible.” Paradise Brokers’ lucrative program has a 100% money back guarantee and they will arrange all your travel, lodging, and excursions. For a limited time, get a $ 1,500 reimbursement upon visiting your new property.

For more information call 1-877-CRLand1, (275-2631). Grab your FREE 40 minute DVD and the ‘Blueprint to Costa Rica Riches’ NOW at http://www.developingparadise.com.

###







Attachments




























Vocus©Copyright 1997-

, Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.
Vocus, PRWeb, and Publicity Wire are trademarks or registered trademarks of Vocus, Inc. or Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.







More Costa Rica Press Releases

off
March 27, 2011 @ 11:11 pm
Greg

Costa Rica Living & Retirement Tips

Costa Rica Living & Retirement Tips










(PRWEB) October 8, 2005

The report was written by Scott Oliver, the author of ‘How To Buy Costa Rica Real Estate Without Losing Your Camisa’ (Shirt) the best-selling book of it’s kind.

The Costa Rica Retirement 124 Tips & Traps report touches on the challenges that anyone would need to know about when thinking of living, retiring and buying real estate in Costa Rica.

For example:

1. Contrary to what some people might tell you, there is no Multiple Listing Service in Costa Rica so trying to establish even a rough idea of what a property is worth is difficult. Take a look on the internet and one can often find the exact same property listed by different ‘brokers’ at dramatically different prices…

2. Half the population of Costa Rica call themselves ‘Realtors’ because they do not need any qualifications, training or experience whatsoever to call themselves a ‘Realtor’ and there is nobody watching over the people that do…

3. There is an organization of ‘brokers’ involved with Costa Rica real estate, however, very few people who call themselves ‘Realtors’ have even heard of it never mind belong to it … And nobody is regulating or watching over these people!

4. And since the laws governing Costa Rica real estate are based on ‘Napoleonic Laws’ and not ‘Common Laws’ as they are in the US & Canada right? No matter how much experience a US citizen has with real estate, it’s a whole different legal system in Costa Rica.

This means that when it comes to buying Costa Rica real estate, more than likely, a person could be listening to ‘expert’ advice coming from someone with zero qualifications or training in real estate, who is trying very hard to earn a sales commission selling a property that could be dramatically overpriced…

Sounds like a recipe for disaster and it can be so this free Costa Rica Retirement 124 Tips & Traps report is the perfect starting point for those Americans who wish to avoid any expensive ‘learning experiences.’

Please note that the Costa Rica Retirement 124 Tips & Traps report will be available for free to registered users for a limited time only so download yours now while you can.

To receive this free 18 page report takes only seconds:

1. Register at http://www.welovecostarica.com/register.php? and then

2. After you have confirmed your registration, log-on and visit Downloads where you will find your report in the Costa Rica Retirement section.

Best wishes from your ‘amigo’ in Costa Rica

Scott Oliver – Founder

http://WeLoveCostaRica.com

###




















Vocus©Copyright 1997-

, Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.
Vocus, PRWeb, and Publicity Wire are trademarks or registered trademarks of Vocus, Inc. or Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.







off



Waterford, Ireland (Vocus) July 26, 2010

In its newly released August issue, International Living magazine reports that Costa Rica is nearing a goal it set for itself in 2007… to be carbon-neutral in time for the country’s 200th birthday in 2021.

Three years after making that pledge, Costa Rica is practically there. It already produces 90% of its electricity from renewable sources—mostly hydropower, wind and geothermal. Next, it will add solar to the mix, introduce electric trains and buses, move to clean bio-diesel and bio-ethanol fuel for cars, and help reforest its jungles.

Costa Rica is a world leader on green issues, with more than a quarter of its territory devoted to protected areas like national parks and biological reserves.

International Living also reports on its website, www.InternationalLiving.com, that Costa Rica was recently ranked as the happiest place on earth, due in large part to these same ecological policies.

According to the Happy Planet Index (HPI) compiled by the New Economics Foundation, Costa Ricans have the highest life satisfaction in the world. At the same time, they live longer than Americans yet have an ecological footprint that is less than a quarter the size.

The difference, says the report, shows that it is possible to live long, happy lives without the tremendous burden on the world’s resources found in the world’s highest-consuming nations.

International Living has been covering Costa Rica as a top retirement haven for many years, thanks to its eco-conscious policies, lack of standing army, relatively low cost of living and world-class health care system. The country is a favorite with retirees and second-home buyers from the U.S. and Canada and is also a hotspot for medical tourism. Last month, International Living named Costa Rica’s Nicoya Peninsula as one of the healthiest places on earth to live in its Health Index.

See full story at http://internationalliving.com/2010/07/26-costa-rica-nears-carbon-neutral-goal/.

For more information:

Dan Prescher

dprescher(at)internationalliving(dot)com

+1 (402) 403-1941

www.internationalliving.com

###





off

Question by will v: How much money does an engineer living in Costa Rica make if he is certified by the CFIA?
I’m going to the Columbia engineering school, and when I graduate I would like to move to Costa Rica, gain citizenship and work there. How much would you expect an engineer with my credentials (BE from Columbia University, and a couple years experience) to make? Would moving there even be a reasonable goal?

Best answer:

Answer by Orange
A whole lot less than here.

Keep this in mind… the average income there is $ 5,000/year. I would say no more than $ 40-50K with a lot of luck. And you better have a good security system because the better your lifestyle, the more they will try to rob you (whether you’re home or out). There’s a reson there are bars in the windows, high fences, and barbed-wire on almost every single house in CR, even the ones made of mud. Okay, I haven’t seen any mud houses, that was a joke. But even the crappy looking houses that nobody would ever burgalrize have tight “security”.

My question is why? You could live like royalty in the US with those credentials. And if you like CR so much, spend a couple months a year there. But whatever you do, don’t buy any “vacation” property there, unless you plan on living there year-round. They have insane laws there were squatters (a homeless family) can move into your place when you’re not there, and after some period of time, you lose the rights to that property and the courts award title to them. Absolutely mind-boggling, but true.

What do you think? Answer below!

off
January 10, 2011 @ 3:20 pm
Greg

Move to Paradise with Living Abroad in Costa Rica

Emeryville, CA (PRWEB) October 20, 2004

Avalon Travel Publishing announces the release of the first edition of Living Abroad in Costa Rica, a 432-page guide that gives readers the tools to thrive in this verdant Central American country also known for its pacifism and stability.

More up-to-date and comprehensive than any other relocation guide to Costa Rica, Living Abroad in Costs Rica provides invaluable and detailed advice about health care, employment, and real estate, and includes extensive descriptions of every part of this small but varied country. The guide shows how anyone, from student to retiree, can work, study, travel, and live in Costa Rica.

The San Francisco Chronicle calls the Living Abroad series Â?smartly organized books that tell you how to blend in.Â? The author was also interviewed on CNN fn (July 2004) as an expert on moving abroad (see video clip at www.LivingAbroadinCostaRica.com).

Living Abroad in Costa Rica gives not only practical advice but provides background on the country, including history, religion, the arts, gender roles, and ethnicity and class. In addition, the book contains a Spanish Phrasebook, comprehensive lists of both Spanish language schools and private elementary and secondary schools, and the names of key realtors in different parts of the country. There is also a chapter on Planning Your Fact Finding trip that lists recommended hotels, restaurants, and sights, and provides a variety of suggested itineraries.

About Living Abroad in Costa Rica:

The 432-page first edition of Living Abroad in Costa Rica (ISBN 1-56691-652-6) was published by Avalon Travel Publishing of Emeryville, California in September 2004. Priced at $ 17.95, this book is distributed in the United States by Publishers Group West, in Canada by Publishers Group Canada, in Europe by Hi Marketing, in Australia and New Zealand by Bookwise International, For more information, visit http://www.LivingAbroadinCostaRica.com

Contact information:

Erin Van Rheenen

LIVING ABROAD IN COSTA RICA

http://www.LivingAbroadinCostaRica.com


510-595-3664

###



More Costa Rica Press Releases

off

Copyright © 2012 ·Nosara. Supported by Ultimate Hosting